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New Back Pain Audio Program is Free!

FREE BACK PAIN AUDIO PROGRAM!

As most people who suffer from back pain, sciatica or neck pain are very aware, the symptoms of these pains can be treated, but are mostly temporary at best. The sad fact is that the real cause of the pain is almost always overlooked.

Most doctors only treat the symptoms. They use “band-aid” treatments like:
• Cortisone shots
• Dangerous drugs
• Physical therapy
• Surgery
• Chiropractic manipulation

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Sitting and How We Continue to Hurt Our Backs

It sounds a bit silly, but when you understand what to look for it turns out that sitting down can be one of the most dangerous things you can do for your back.

How you sit is a function of the chairs you sit in (including your car!), the height of the chair and table or work surfaces, the activity you do while sitting and the way you sit.

Some of this is certainly habitual – the way we sit and how we hold our bodies – but the chairs we use can also affect how we sit, how comfortable we are in any given position and how much strain we put on our back muscles and ligaments.

Most people tend to sit with bad posture more often than not. It’s not their fault, since their muscles weren’t trained from childhood to sit with perfect posture and their muscles have been trained to sit with poor posture for years. And the only time they sit up straight is when they remember to (sound familiar?) – it’s just darn hard work unless the furniture and seating we use makes it easy.

There are simple things you can do to remedy this and several things you can look out for to identify which chairs and seats can potentially cause you problems. Here is an excellent video that shows you what to look for and how to remedy bad seating.

Click here now to watch it.

Most folks need multiple types of treatments to find lasting relief and the last thing you want to do is undo everything you’ve accomplished every time you sit down.

Click here now to watch it.

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Information about Celiac Disease

Acid Reflux

Celiac Disease

On this page:

What is celiac disease?

Celiac disease is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. People who have celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a protein in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is found mainly in foods but may also be found in everyday products such as medicines, vitamins, and lip balms.

Drawing of the digestive system with the small intestine highlighted and the stomach, liver, small intestine, and colon labeled.
The small intestine is shaded above.

When people with celiac disease eat foods or use products containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging or destroying villi—the tiny, fingerlike protrusions lining the small intestine. Villi normally allow nutrients from food to be absorbed through the walls of the small intestine into the bloodstream. Without healthy villi, a person becomes malnourished, no matter how much food one eats.

Drawing of a section of the small intestine with detail of villi. The small intestine and villi are labeled.
Villi on the lining of the small intestine help absorb nutrients.

Celiac disease is both a disease of malabsorption—meaning nutrients are not absorbed properly—and an abnormal immune reaction to gluten. Celiac disease is also known as celiac sprue, nontropical sprue, and gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Celiac disease is genetic, meaning it runs in families. Sometimes the disease is triggered—or becomes active for the first time—after surgery, pregnancy, childbirth, viral infection, or severe emotional stress.

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What are the symptoms of celiac disease?

Symptoms of celiac disease vary from person to person. Symptoms may occur in the digestive system or in other parts of the body. Digestive symptoms are more common in infants and young children and may include

  • abdominal bloating and pain
  • chronic diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • constipation
  • pale, foul-smelling, or fatty stool
  • weight loss

Irritability is another common symptom in children. Malabsorption of nutrients during the years when nutrition is critical to a child’s normal growth and development can result in other problems such as failure to thrive in infants, delayed growth and short stature, delayed puberty, and dental enamel defects of the permanent teeth.

Adults are less likely to have digestive symptoms and may instead have one or more of the following:

  • unexplained iron-deficiency anemia
  • fatigue
  • bone or joint pain
  • arthritis
  • bone loss or osteoporosis
  • depression or anxiety
  • tingling numbness in the hands and feet
  • seizures
  • missed menstrual periods
  • infertility or recurrent miscarriage
  • canker sores inside the mouth
  • an itchy skin rash called dermatitis herpetiformis

People with celiac disease may have no symptoms but can still develop complications of the disease over time. Long-term complications include malnutrition—which can lead to anemia, osteoporosis, and miscarriage, among other problems—liver diseases, and cancers of the intestine.

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Why are celiac disease symptoms so varied?

Researchers are studying the reasons celiac disease affects people differently. The length of time a person was breastfed, the age a person started eating gluten-containing foods, and the amount of gluten-containing foods one eats are three factors thought to play a role in when and how celiac disease appears. Some studies have shown, for example, that the longer a person was breastfed, the later the symptoms of celiac disease appear.

Symptoms also vary depending on a person’s age and the degree of damage to the small intestine. Many adults have the disease for a decade or more before they are diagnosed. The longer a person goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the chance of developing long-term complications.

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What other health problems do people with celiac disease have?

People with celiac disease tend to have other diseases in which the immune system attacks the body’s healthy cells and tissues. The connection between celiac disease and these diseases may be genetic. They include

  • type 1 diabetes
  • autoimmune thyroid disease
  • autoimmune liver disease
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • Addison’s disease, a condition in which the glands that produce critical hormones are damaged
  • Sjögren’s syndrome, a condition in which the glands that produce tears and saliva are destroyed

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How common is celiac disease?

Celiac disease affects people in all parts of the world. Originally thought to be a rare childhood syndrome, celiac disease is now known to be a common genetic disorder. More than 2 million people in the United States have the disease, or about 1 in 133 people.1 Among people who have a first-degree relative—a parent, sibling, or child—diagnosed with celiac disease, as many as 1 in 22 people may have the disease.2

Celiac disease is also more common among people with other genetic disorders including Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, a condition that affects girls’ development.

1Fasano A, Berti I, Gerarduzzi T, et al. Prevalence of celiac disease in at-risk and not-at-risk groups in the United States. Archives of Internal Medicine. 2003;163(3):268–292.

2Ibid.

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How is celiac disease diagnosed?

Recognizing celiac disease can be difficult because some of its symptoms are similar to those of other diseases. Celiac disease can be confused with irritable bowel syndrome, iron-deficiency anemia caused by menstrual blood loss, inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulitis, intestinal infections, and chronic fatigue syndrome. As a result, celiac disease has long been underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. As doctors become more aware of the many varied symptoms of the disease and reliable blood tests become more available, diagnosis rates are increasing.

Blood Tests

People with celiac disease have higher than normal levels of certain autoantibodies—proteins that react against the body’s own cells or tissues—in their blood. To diagnose celiac disease, doctors will test blood for high levels of anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTGA) or anti-endomysium antibodies (EMA). If test results are negative but celiac disease is still suspected, additional blood tests may be needed.

Before being tested, one should continue to eat a diet that includes foods with gluten, such as breads and pastas. If a person stops eating foods with gluten before being tested, the results may be negative for celiac disease even if the disease is present.

Intestinal Biopsy

If blood tests and symptoms suggest celiac disease, a biopsy of the small intestine is performed to confirm the diagnosis. During the biopsy, the doctor removes tiny pieces of tissue from the small intestine to check for damage to the villi. To obtain the tissue sample, the doctor eases a long, thin tube called an endoscope through the patient’s mouth and stomach into the small intestine. The doctor then takes the samples using instruments passed through the endoscope.

Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an intensely itchy, blistering skin rash that affects 15 to 25 percent of people with celiac disease.3 The rash usually occurs on the elbows, knees, and buttocks. Most people with DH have no digestive symptoms of celiac disease.

DH is diagnosed through blood tests and a skin biopsy. If the antibody tests are positive and the skin biopsy has the typical findings of DH, patients do not need to have an intestinal biopsy. Both the skin disease and the intestinal disease respond to a gluten-free diet and recur if gluten is added back into the diet. The rash symptoms can be controlled with antibiotics such as dapsone. Because dapsone does not treat the intestinal condition, people with DH must maintain a gluten-free diet.

Screening

Screening for celiac disease means testing for the presence of autoantibodies in the blood in people without symptoms. Americans are not routinely screened for celiac disease. However, because celiac disease is hereditary, family members of a person with the disease may wish to be tested. Four to 12 percent of an affected person’s first-degree relatives will also have the disease.4

3Rodrigo L. Celiac disease. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2006;12(41):6585–6593.

4Ibid.

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How is celiac disease treated?

The only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Doctors may ask a newly diagnosed person to work with a dietitian on a gluten-free diet plan. A dietitian is a health care professional who specializes in food and nutrition. Someone with celiac disease can learn from a dietitian how to read ingredient lists and identify foods that contain gluten in order to make informed decisions at the grocery store and when eating out.

For most people, following this diet will stop symptoms, heal existing intestinal damage, and prevent further damage. Improvement begins within days of starting the diet. The small intestine usually heals in 3 to 6 months in children but may take several years in adults. A healed intestine means a person now has villi that can absorb nutrients from food into the bloodstream.

To stay well, people with celiac disease must avoid gluten for the rest of their lives. Eating even a small amount of gluten can damage the small intestine. The damage will occur in anyone with the disease, including people without noticeable symptoms. Depending on a person’s age at diagnosis, some problems will not improve, such as short stature and dental enamel defects.

Some people with celiac disease show no improvement on the gluten-free diet. The most common reason for poor response to the diet is that small amounts of gluten are still being consumed. Hidden sources of gluten include additives such as modified food starch, preservatives, and stabilizers made with wheat. And because many corn and rice products are produced in factories that also manufacture wheat products, they can be contaminated with wheat gluten.

Rarely, the intestinal injury will continue despite a strictly gluten-free diet. People with this condition, known as refractory celiac disease, have severely damaged intestines that cannot heal. Because their intestines are not absorbing enough nutrients, they may need to receive nutrients directly into their bloodstream through a vein, or intravenously. Researchers are evaluating drug treatments for refractory celiac disease.

The Gluten-free Diet

A gluten-free diet means not eating foods that contain wheat, rye, and barley. The foods and products made from these grains should also be avoided. In other words, a person with celiac disease should not eat most grain, pasta, cereal, and many processed foods.

Despite these restrictions, people with celiac disease can eat a well-balanced diet with a variety of foods. They can use potato, rice, soy, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, or bean flour instead of wheat flour. They can buy gluten-free bread, pasta, and other products from stores that carry organic foods, or order products from special food companies. Gluten-free products are increasingly available from mainstream stores.

“Plain” meat, fish, rice, fruits, and vegetables do not contain gluten, so people with celiac disease can freely eat these foods. In the past, people with celiac disease were advised not to eat oats. New evidence suggests that most people can safely eat small amounts of oats, as long as the oats are not contaminated with wheat gluten during processing. People with celiac disease should work closely with their health care team when deciding whether to include oats in their diet. Examples of other foods that are safe to eat and those that are not are provided in the table.

The gluten-free diet requires a completely new approach to eating. Newly diagnosed people and their families may find support groups helpful as they learn to adjust to a new way of life. People with celiac disease must be cautious about what they buy for lunch at school or work, what they purchase at the grocery store, what they eat at restaurants or parties, and what they grab for a snack. Eating out can be a challenge. When in doubt about a menu item, a person with celiac disease should ask the waiter or chef about ingredients and preparation or if a gluten-free menu is available.

Gluten is also used in some medications. People with celiac disease should ask a pharmacist if prescribed medications contain wheat. Because gluten is sometimes used as an additive in unexpected products—such as lipstick and play dough—reading product labels is important. If the ingredients are not listed on the label, the manufacturer should provide a list upon request. With practice, screening for gluten becomes second nature.

New Food Labeling

The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), which took effect on January 1, 2006, requires food labels to clearly identify wheat and other common food allergens in the list of ingredients. FALCPA also requires the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to develop and finalize rules for the use of the term “gluten free” on product labels.

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The Gluten-free Diet: Some Examples

In 2006, the American Dietetic Association updated its recommendations for a gluten-free diet. The following chart is based on the 2006 recommendations. This list is not complete, so people with celiac disease should discuss gluten-free food choices with a dietitian or physician who specializes in celiac disease. People with celiac disease should always read food ingredient lists carefully to make sure the food does not contain gluten.

Allowed Foods
amaranth
arrowroot
buckwheat
cassava
corn
flax
Indian rice grass
Job’s tears
legumes
millet
nuts
potatoes
quinoa
rice
sago
seeds
sorghum
soy
tapioca
teff
wild rice
yucca
Foods To Avoid
wheat

  • including einkorn, emmer, spelt, kamut
  • wheat starch, wheat bran, wheat germ, cracked wheat, hydrolyzed wheat protein
barley
rye
triticale (a cross between wheat and rye)
Other Wheat Products
bromated flour
durum flour
enriched flour
farina
graham flour
phosphated flour
plain flour
self-rising flour
semolina
white flour
Processed Foods that May Contain Wheat, Barley, or Rye*
bouillon cubes
brown rice syrup
candy
chips/potato chips
cold cuts, hot dogs, salami, sausage
communion wafers
French fries
gravy
imitation fish
matzo
rice mixes
sauces
seasoned tortilla chips
self-basting turkey
soups
soy sauce
vegetables in sauce

* Most of these foods can be found gluten-free. When in doubt, check with the food manufacturer.

Source: Thompson T. Celiac Disease Nutrition Guide, 2nd ed. Chicago: American Dietetic Association; 2006. © American Dietetic Association. Adapted with permission. For a complete copy of the Celiac Disease Nutrition Guide, please visit www.eatright.org.

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Points to Remember

  • People with celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a protein in wheat, rye, and barley.
  • Untreated celiac disease damages the small intestine and interferes with nutrient absorption.
  • Without treatment, people with celiac disease can develop complications such as osteoporosis, anemia, and cancer.
  • A person with celiac disease may or may not have symptoms.
  • Diagnosis involves blood tests and, in most cases, a biopsy of the small intestine.
  • Since celiac disease is hereditary, family members of a person with celiac disease may wish to be tested.
  • Celiac disease is treated by eliminating all gluten from the diet. The gluten-free diet is a lifetime requirement.
  • A dietitian can teach a person with celiac disease about food selection, label reading, and other strategies to help manage the disease.

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Hope through Research

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases conducts and supports research on celiac disease. Researchers are studying new options for diagnosing celiac disease, including capsule endoscopy. In this technique, patients swallow a capsule containing a tiny video camera that records images of the small intestine.

Several drug treatments for celiac disease are under evaluation. Researchers are also studying a combination of enzymes—proteins that aid chemical reactions in the body—that detoxify gluten before it enters the small intestine.

Scientists are also developing educational materials for standardized medical training to raise awareness among health care providers. The hope is that increased understanding and awareness will lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease.

Participants in clinical trials can play a more active role in their own health care, gain access to new research treatments before they are widely available, and help others by contributing to medical research. For information about current studies, visit www.ClinicalTrials.gov.

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For More Information

American Celiac Disease Alliance
2504 Duxbury Place
Alexandria, VA 22308
Phone: 703–622–3331 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 703–622–3331 end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Email: info@americanceliac.org
Internet: www.americanceliac.org

American Dietetic Association
120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000
Chicago, IL 60606–6995
Email: hotline@eatright.org
Internet: www.eatright.org

Celiac Disease Foundation
13251 Ventura Boulevard, #1
Studio City, CA 91604
Phone: 818–990–2354 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 818–990–2354 end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Fax: 818–990–2379
Email: cdf@celiac.org
Internet: www.celiac.org

Celiac Sprue Association/USA Inc.
P.O. Box 31700
Omaha, NE 68131–0700
Phone: 1–877–CSA–4CSA begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1–877–CSA–4CSA end_of_the_skype_highlighting (272–4272)
Fax: 402–643–4108
Email: celiacs@csaceliacs.org
Internet: www.csaceliacs.org

Children’s Digestive Health and Nutrition Foundation
P.O. Box 6
Flourtown, PA 19031
Phone: 215–233–0808 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 215–233–0808 end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Fax: 215–233–3918
Email: mstallings@naspghan.org
Internet: www.cdhnf.org
www.celiachealth.org

Gluten Intolerance Group of North America
31214 124th Avenue SE
Auburn, WA 98092–3667
Phone: 253–833–6655 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 253–833–6655 end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Fax: 253–833–6675
Email: info@gluten.net
Internet: www.gluten.net

National Foundation for Celiac Awareness
224 South Maple Street
Ambler, PA 19002–0544
Phone: 215–325–1306 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 215–325–1306 end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Email: info@celiaccentral.org
Internet: www.celiaccentral.org

North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
P.O. Box 6
Flourtown, PA 19031
Phone: 215–233–0808 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 215–233–0808 end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Fax: 215–233–3918
Email: naspghan@naspghan.org
Internet: www.naspghan.org
www.cdhnf.org

The Celiac Disease Awareness Campaign

To meet the need for comprehensive and current information about celiac disease, the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), launched the Celiac Disease Awareness Campaign. The Awareness Campaign is the result of the combined ideas and efforts of the professional and voluntary organizations that focus on celiac disease, along with the NIDDK, the National Institutes of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Visit www.celiac.nih.gov to learn more about the Awareness Campaign.

You may also find additional information about this topic by visiting MedlinePlus at www.medlineplus.gov.

This publication may contain information about medications. When prepared, this publication included the most current information available. For updates or for questions about any medications, contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration toll-free at 1–888–INFO–FDA begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1–888–INFO–FDA end_of_the_skype_highlighting (1–888–463–6332 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1–888–463–6332 end_of_the_skype_highlighting) or visit www.fda.gov. Consult your doctor for more information.

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National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

2 Information Way
Bethesda, MD 20892–3570
Phone: 1–800–891–5389 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1–800–891–5389 end_of_the_skype_highlighting
TTY: 1–866–569–1162 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1–866–569–1162 end_of_the_skype_highlighting
Fax: 703–738–4929
Email: nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov
Internet: www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the Clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. The NDDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases.

Publications produced by the Clearinghouse are carefully reviewed by both NIDDK scientists and outside experts. This publication was reviewed by Ciaran Kelly, M.D., Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Mitchell Cohen, M.D., Cincinnati, Children’s Hospital Medical Center; Walter Reed Army Medical Center; National Foundation for Celiac Awareness; Celiac Disease Foundation; Celiac Sprue Association/USA, Inc.; and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff. The gluten-free diet chart was reviewed by Alice Bast and Nancy Dickens, National Foundation for Celiac Awareness; Cynthia Kupper, R.D., C.D., Gluten Intolerance Group; and Elaine Monarch, Celiac Disease Foundation.

This publication is not copyrighted. The Clearinghouse encourages users of this publication to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired.


NIH Publication No. 08–4269
September 2008

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Posture and Your Back Pain

Unless you have a congenital disease causing you back pain or if your back pain has arisen from a serious illness, for the vast majority of people any back pain that develops can frequently be attributable to their posture, in relation to their spine, in one way or another. The key significance of posture and back pain is the efficient distribution of your body weight around the body’s center of gravity, especially in the lower back/spine, both when at rest and moving.

Back pain, bad posture and bad habits.

In the vast majority of cases where back pain arises from bad posture it is invariably due to the person developing bad habits with their posture, which over a period of years they fail to correct. The bad habit causing the back pain could be something as simple as sitting in a slumped manner in chairs or being in the habit of hunching the back or shoulders when upright – all of which should be avoided if you want to avoid back pain. Also, being considerably overweight, not to mention obese, is a common factor causing bad posture, resulting in back aches and pains in modern America society. So, even the bad habit of eating more than our body’s really need should be avoided if you also want to avoid back pain.

Your muscles and your posture.

When it comes to avoiding back pains through bad posture you first have to understand the role that your muscles play in protecting you against back pain. Without getting into a creative design/evolution argument – a problem inherent in all of us regarding our muscles and our backs is that the spine simply wasn’t originally designed for upright walking. To this end, and to help avoid back pain, it is widely believed that strong back, chest and stomach muscles are required for a good upright walking posture, according to the spine that we have evolved with or inherited if you prefer. Whilst these muscles are important we are actually as reliant, if not more so, on the smaller muscles and ligaments deep inside our bodies that clad or surround the spine, to keep it upright and in good posture so as to avoid the risk of back pain; which they do by minimizing any compressions of the spine. In case you don’t already know, muscles don’t operate in isolation but are reliant on strong tendons joining the muscle to bone and ligaments that surround bone joints keeping them in place. So, in keeping a good posture and reducing back pain risks you have to make sure these deep seated muscles supporting your spine are ‘fit for purpose’ by exercising them, something which people with modern sedentary lives can forget to do.

Minimizing back pain by controlling your posture.

Going to the gym and building up your back, chest or abdominal muscles is one way to help improve your posture and reduce any back pain you might be experiencing. However, just how do you exercise those muscles deeper inside your body that are so important to having a good posture? The fact here is that the only way you can exercise those inner muscles is by maintaining a good posture. The spinal muscles control two types of movements: voluntary ones such as bending, rotating, lifting, carrying and pushing. They also control some involuntary, or sub-conscious ones, including: controlling our balance, maintaining our good/erect postures and, almost ironically, maintaining a good tone of the spinal muscles. Supplementary to this, there are some exercise techniques that can further help some people, like Pilates and some forms of yoga, to develop good spinal muscles. However, and to some extent following from the earlier comment, the single most effective way to properly exercise the muscles that both protect and support your back is to be constantly aware of your posture, adjusting and improving it – until the muscles strengthen and remove or reduce the back pain you’re feeling. This doesn’t just mean maintaining a straight back, level shoulders and head-up posture when standing or walking; but needs to also mean that you’re thinking about your posture when sitting or lying down and if you are overweight – dieting and exercising regularly. Using the references below, you can find further information on recommended postures but – remember this has to be a lifetime commitment if you truly want to banish that back pain for ever.


Comment.
Here at finallypainless.com we advise you to visit your medical consultant regarding any back pain, as it could require further investigation. In compiling this article we would also like to acknowledge the following references:

  • http://georgiahealthinfo.gov/cms/node/128455?slide=2
  • http://www.umm.edu/spinecenter/education/rehabilitation_for_low_back_pain.htm
  • http://www.healthfinder.gov/prevention/PrintTopic.aspx?topicID=46
  • http://www.nwhealth.edu/healthyU/liveNaturally/backpain.html
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Don’t let uncertainty leave you powerless!

Health care reform leaves many questions unanswered, but don’t let those questions worry you. Take your health into your own hands: visit your doctor if you have any questions (don’t be afraid to make an appointment); there are many products out there you can research and investigate yourself and have approved by your doctor. However, don’t rely on just any source you can find on Google – read what the experts are researching at centers like the Mayo Clinic, The FDA, National Institutes of Health, The Canadian Institute of Health Research, and other authorities in medical research.

Value Health Card Inc.

So what does health care reform mean for you?
There are many possibilities: some people believe that waiting lines will overwhelm emergency rooms; others believe that it will bring about a healthier, wealthier middle-class. One bias is the dogmatic, for-profit health organizations which would like you to believe that there are astronomical waiting lines in countries like Canada where Health Care is public. Generally they use extreme case scenarios as to scare the public health care system out of you. On the other end of the spectrum is the push for fully funded public Health Care by advocates such as Michael Moore. Moore raises great points in his documentary, Sicko, about the availability of universal health care that is present in many developed countries, and the fact that it leads to a healthier nation over all (in that a trip to the hospital does not break a middle class family).

In fact, the large bureaucracies can slow down health care waiting lines, while privately owned health care organizations can provide prime competition to the best surgeons possible. This must be weighed against the fact that private health organizations are designed with a loser in mind: that is, the winners are the shareholders, and the losers are those who cannot afford it and those who are left by the way-side due to unfairly rejected claims.

There are enough arguments on both sides to keep this debate going well into the next millennia; however, in order for you to make the most informed decision you need to explore the issue objectively from both sides. Do not be fooled by obscure, irrelevant claims, or fall prey to bogus statistical data. Read, research, explore, decide!

Health to Happiness

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Persistant or Chronic Back Pain?

When you experience back pain your back is simply telling you that something is wrong with you physically and you need to repair the damage. Exactly the same as the pain we feel if cut with a sharp knife while cooking, resulting in us needing to repair the wound, feeling a back pain means something is wrong and needs to be healed. When we suddenly feel a pain anywhere in our bodies it is referred to as an acute pain. Back pains are invariably acute ones, which means that they will most often arise as soon as the back has been damaged.

Chronic back pains.

You will have read in detail elsewhere about how back pains can be caused, and generally speaking back pain can often result from an awkward movement or moving a heavy load. Not only can such actions cause back pains, but also they can cause pains elsewhere in our bodies, such as our arms and legs. Quite often a pain in the leg or arm can quite quickly heal itself by being rested. However, being a part of our bodies that we cannot refrain from using unless we keep ourselves totally immobile, unlike those other parts of the body it is very difficult to allow the back to rest and heal itself quickly. Consequently over a period of time although the back pain hasn’t gone away it can seem less intense. This effect is simply because over time, sub-consciously our bodies can become accustomed to a certain level of pain, so start to treat having the pain as almost a ‘new normality’. If a back pain persists for any period of time, even though it may seem less intense, then the back pain is said to be a chronic one.

Persistent back pain.

Whether your back pain is acute having suddenly come on or a chronic one, that you’ve had for some time, the one thing that can be guaranteed is that it will be persistent. The persistence of back pains is simply a way for your body to constantly remind you that you have a physiological problem with your back that needs healing. Even though the back pain signals remain persistent, in effect telling you to rest your back, you mustn’t stop using your back. If at all bearable it is vital that you keep your back gently exercised through the persistent pain. Indeed it is almost ironical that the very fact that you have a back pain means that in all likelihood the damage to your back isn’t too serious. Please note here, when mentioning exercising your back when you have a back pain – the emphasis is on gentle exercise to keep it mobile, nothing strenuous. Finally, whilst pain is a sensory response to something being wrong with our bodies, the experience of pain also has an emotional response within us. In other words, some people are better at coping with back pains than others. Whilst in some respects being able to cope with back pain is good, in that you can keep yourself more mobile, in the instance of persistent back pain – having a high back pain tolerance could mean that the back takes far longer to heal as you could be tempted to overburden it to soon.


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What to do when back pain strikes.

Whilst not wishing to labor the point, when back pain strikes you must keep your back mobile without causing it any further strain. If your back pain is a non-specific one, that is to say not caused by some underlying medical condition, it can strike in the upper back around the shoulders and neck, the middle of your back which will often give rise to lumbago back pains or they could be in your lower back, especially if caused by a trapped sciatic nerve. Simply by keeping the back mobile with gentle exercises, most people will find that within a few days or weeks at most, a lot the back pain will have dissipated and they are able to return to a normal life. If the back pain is persistent and intense then using an ‘over the counter’ painkiller from your pharmacy, or a preparatory back pain analgesic, will help you to manage the pain. Of course, you must never exceed the recommended dosage for any medications you decide to take. There are plenty of recommended back pain exercises to find on the internet; and for some people that have recurring back pains over long periods of time they can find things like acupuncture a benefit to them, in relieving their back pain. If you do find your back pain is a recurrent one that you can associate with a certain activity, it might pay you to re-consider how you do certain things; such as sitting at a computer desk or moving heavy loads, not to mention your general posture.


Comment. – Here at finallypainless.com we advise you to visit your medical consultant regarding any back pain, as it could require further investigation.
In compiling this article we would also like to acknowledge the following references:

  • http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Back_Pain/default.asp
  • http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/common/pain/treatment/117.html
  • http://www.hsc.virginia.edu/uvahealth/adult_orthopaedics/lowback.cfm
  • http://www.csmc.edu/5261.html
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Free Book Offers Back Pain Solutions

Back pain comes in many many different forms, although most people only identify with one or two of them. It is not surprising when one considers the incredible complexity of the spine and the intricate maze of muscles that make our bodies work. But, whether it is neck pain, lower back pain, pinched nerves, sciatica, vertebrae compression, or other issues, as you know, pain is downright uncomfortable. And relief from that pain, and ultimately curing the cause, is paramount.

As you likely know, just takiing medication for the pain may work for a short term relief, but side effects and other issues make this at best a transient solution.

As we’ve found, learning how the pain is created and the best methods of handling the various conditions is the key to ultimately eliminating the various forms of back pain. Whether from an injury or from long term repetitive activities, there is much to know about how the pain is caused and aleviated. And there are many helpful resources out there that can give you the knowledge to use in your own solution to back pain.

One incredible resource (and free at that!) is a new book called The 7 Day Back Pain Cure. Besides being a great source of information that can help you and your quest to eliminate back pain, it also points the way to a number of videos and other resources you will likely find valuable. As we said, it is free, plus it’s an actual paperback book, so follow this link to The 7 Day Back Pain Cure and get your own copy. You can’t know “too much” about pain and how to resolve it!

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